INKxWELL

banal-adventures:

bisexualpiratequeen:

"Researchers at the University of Western Australia decided to revamp the way they studied Viking remains. Previously, researchers had misidentified skeletons as male simply because they were buried with their swords and shields. (Female remains were identified by their oval brooches, and not much else.) By studying osteological signs of gender within the bones themselves, researchers discovered that approximately half of the remains were actually female warriors, given a proper burial with their weapons.”

Women have always fought. We have always been there, ‘contributing to history’. Our own, modern sexism contributes to the erasure of it.

(Bolding mine)

And let’s not forget the Etruscan “prince” who turned out to be a (middle-aged) prinCESS or the research that reveals that prehistoric handprints were most likely made by women.

suddenlyoranges:

whatthefjoey:

I heard you were talking shit


THIS IS THE BEST

suddenlyoranges:

whatthefjoey:

I heard you were talking shit

THIS IS THE BEST

guerillasforever:

I’ll tell you whats wrong with society. No one drinks from the skulls of their enemies anymore.

plutoniumrain:

plutoniumRain

plutoniumrain:

plutoniumRain

vintagegal:

Elsa Lanchester in The Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

Fun facts about “The Bride” :

  • "The Bride", the most obscure of Universal Studios’ Classic Monsters, is on screen for less than five minutes and is the only "Classic Monster" never to have killed anyone.
  • Elsa Lanchester’s shock hairdo was held in place by a wired horsehair cage.
  • Elsa Lanchester was only 5’4” but for the role was placed on stilts that made her 7’ tall. The bandages were placed so tightly on her that she was unable to move and had to be carried about the studio and fed through a straw.
  • Elsa Lanchester said that her spitting, hissing performance was inspired by the swans in Regent’s Park, London. “They’re really very nasty creatures,” she said. (x)

malformalady:

A two-headed snapping turtle has been discovered at the Northeast Ark Turtle Farm, in Amagon, Arkansas, in a shipment of 30,000 of the reptiles shipped from China. A state biologist has said turtle mutations are rare, but are becoming more common. Workers at the farm have previously discovered a hatchling with one neck and two heads, but that died at birth.

malformalady:

A two-headed snapping turtle has been discovered at the Northeast Ark Turtle Farm, in Amagon, Arkansas, in a shipment of 30,000 of the reptiles shipped from China. A state biologist has said turtle mutations are rare, but are becoming more common. Workers at the farm have previously discovered a hatchling with one neck and two heads, but that died at birth.